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Ever wonder what it is like to work behind the scenes in a beautiful, historic museum? Do you think it might be fun to go along on a scientific expedition to the remote Amazonian jungles or Antarctica?

Our blog invites readers to take these adventures with us. Go behind the scenes to explore the inner workings and fascinating history of our museum. Tag along with our scientists as they explore the world and make fascinating new discoveries. From curator to docent, everyone on our museum team enjoys sharing their unique experiences through our daily blog.

Indulge your curiosity and love for science, and discover more about Carnegie Museum of Natural History!

Ask a Scientist

Ask a Scientist

Ask a Scientist: What does the bird on this limestone fragment symbolize? Assistant Curator of Science and Research Dr. Erin Peters talks about “Egyptian blue”... Continue Reading

Did you know?

Did you know?

Did you know that the Section of Minerals has the most nearly complete and comprehensive collection of Pennsylvania minerals in the world?

The Passenger Pigeon

The Passenger Pigeon

Memories of an extinct species sometimes serve as a tragic reminders of ongoing human-driven damage to nature. Carnegie Museum of Natural History’s exhibition We Are... Continue Reading

Did you know?

Did you know?

Did you know that water temperature determines the sex of a sea turtle? Warmer waters produce female sea turtles while cooler waters produce males, meaning... Continue Reading

Rethinking the Dodo

Rethinking the Dodo

by Barbara Klein History—not to mention humanity—has not been kind to the dodo bird. As the story goes, the demise of this flightless, clueless, graceless... Continue Reading

Eacles imperialis

Eacles imperialis

by Vanessa Verdecia A culture of imperial moth caterpillars (Eacles imperialis) was reared on oak leaves this summer in Carnegie Museum of Natural History’s Section... Continue Reading

Woman and child: steatite

Woman and child: steatite

Woman and child made of steatite on display in Wyckoff Hall: Polar World (Photo by Hayley Pontia)

T. rex

T. rex

Our T. rex specimens have captured the imagination of children and adults for decades at Carnegie Museum of Natural History. Found in our archives, this... Continue Reading

Quartz var Agate

Quartz var Agate

Quartz var agate, a form of cryptocrystalline quartz, on display in Wertz Gallery of Gems and Jewelry. The microscopic crystals in cryptocrystalline quartz often combine... Continue Reading

Section of Birds

Section of Birds

Our Section of Birds holds approximately the eighth largest collection of birds in North America.

Sasquatch Squash

Sasquatch Squash

On Sunday, October 15, gallery technicians installed a giant squash in the museum’s Sculpture Courtyard. Dave and Carol Stelts grew the pumpkin that is nearly... Continue Reading

Remember pheasants?

Remember pheasants?

by Patrick McShea Remember pheasants? Who could forget a long-tailed, chicken-sized bird with a green head and bright copper body? It wasn’t even necessary to... Continue Reading

Witch Hazel

Witch Hazel

Collected on a spooky Halloween night in 1931 (well, it might have been during the day, but let’s just say night), this specimen was found... Continue Reading

Section of Birds

Section of Birds

We have representatives of roughly 6,200 species of birds in our museum’s Section of Birds. Counting subspecies, we have over 13,000 different bird subspecies.

Leptophis ahaetulla

Leptophis ahaetulla

This Leptophis ahaetulla snake specimen was collected in Belize and is preserved in our Alcohol House, which is home to reptiles and amphibians from around... Continue Reading

Alcohol House Jars

Alcohol House Jars

These jars in in our historic Alcohol House contain the contents of the stomachs of snakes that were collected for scientific study. The Alcohol House... Continue Reading

Minerals

Minerals

From table salt to diamond rings and computer chips, minerals are part of our everyday existence. Carnegie Museum of Natural History has about 1,300 minerals... Continue Reading

Face to face with a polar bear

Face to face with a polar bear

Come face to face with a polar bear in Polar World: Wyckoff Hall of Arctic Life at Carnegie Museum of Natural History.

Fruit Chafer

Fruit Chafer

Meet the fruit chafer, a prime example of adaptation and speciation. These beetles have evolved from the same basic body plan into an array of... Continue Reading

Peafowl Feathers

Peafowl Feathers

This is a close up view of peafowl feathers. Although most people refer to this bird as a peacock, technically only males are called peacocks... Continue Reading

Sasquatch Squash

Sasquatch Squash

On Sunday, October 15 staff installed a giant squash in the museum’s Sculpture Courtyard. Dave and Carol Stelts grew the pumpkin that is nearly 2,000 pounds. This... Continue Reading

Child Mummy

Child Mummy

Walton Hall of Ancient Egypt is home to the mummy of a child who lived sometime during 380–250 B.C. Although the cause of death is... Continue Reading

Rutile Epi Hematite

Rutile Epi Hematite

Found in Brazil, this rutile epi hematite specimen is part of the oxide mineral class.

Solnhofen Fossils

Solnhofen Fossils

These fossils were found in a quarry in Solnhofen, Germany, which was once a series of shallow, tropical lagoons. The environmental conditions at Solnhofen resulted... Continue Reading

Camarasaurus

Camarasaurus

Photo Credit: Joshua Franzos for Carnegie Museum of Natural History A large, herbivorous quadruped, Camarasaurus was among the most common of... Continue Reading

Anzu wyliei

Anzu wyliei

Perhaps better known by its colorful nickname, the “Chicken from Hell,” Anzu wyliei is a bird-like oviraptorosaurian dinosaur. More specifically, it is a member of... Continue Reading

Hummingbird Bands

Hummingbird Bands

At Powdermilll Nature Reserve, researchers use different sized bands for different sized birds, which helps them track the movement and lifespan of populations. The band... Continue Reading

Eastern Bluebird

Eastern Bluebird

This pretty little eastern bluebird was banded this year at Powdermill Nature Reserve’s bird banding lab in Rector, Pa. Although they are common winter residents... Continue Reading

The elf owl

The elf owl

The elf owl, found from the southwestern United States to central Mexico, is the world’s smallest owl. Examine this taxidermy specimen up close, and see... Continue Reading

Vertebrate Paleontology

Vertebrate Paleontology

Did you know that Section of Vertebrate Paleontology curator Matt Lamanna has discovered dinosaur fossils on all seven continents, including Antarctica? Dr. Lamanna leads the... Continue Reading

 Lawrence’s Warbler

 Lawrence’s Warbler

 Lawrence’s Warbler This bright yellow bird is a rare hybrid that was banded at Powdermill Nature Reserve, the museum’s environmental research center, in spring 2017.... Continue Reading

Arctic animals

Arctic animals

Arctic animals, such as the caribou, exhibit dramatic seasonal color changes in fur that help them blend with their natural surroundings. In this diorama, the... Continue Reading

Lean into It

Lean into It

Plum-headed parrots, native to India, have heavy bills powered by strong muscles which allows the birds to shell and crush hard fruits and seeds. This... Continue Reading

Did you know?

Did you know?

Did you know that most of the insects on Earth have yet to be discovered? Carnegie Museum of Natural History curator John Rawlins is particularly... Continue Reading

Giant leopard moths

Giant leopard moths

Giant leopard moths can secrete a yellow liquid from their thorax that works as a chemical defense against predators. This one, spotted at Powdermill Nature... Continue Reading

Can you dig it?

Can you dig it?

Can you dig it? The exhibition hall, Age of Mammals: The Cenozoic Era, has a new look that includes this fun logo for Bonehunters’ Quarry.... Continue Reading

Black rhinoceros

Black rhinoceros

Scattered in small populations throughout the African thornbush, the once-plentiful browsers, the black rhinoceros, may be on the brink of extinction. See a life-sized reproduction... Continue Reading

European Roller

European Roller

The bright blue European Roller (Coracias garrulus) breeds in southern and eastern Europe through to Siberia and winters in Africa. These specimens from Carnegie Museum... Continue Reading

Burning Ivory

Burning Ivory

Dr. Eric Dorfman, the Daniel G. and Carole L. Kamin Director of Carnegie Museum of Natural History, recently wrote about the complicated practice of burning... Continue Reading

Behind the scenes

Behind the scenes

Behind the scenes in Carnegie Museum of Natural History’s Alcohol House with Curatorial Assistant Kaylin Martin(Courtesy Kathy Hair)

Mr. Yuk

Mr. Yuk

On May 31, Carnegie Museum of Natural History held a special VIP event to honor the achievements of museum board member Dr. Richard Moriarty, creator... Continue Reading

Handwritten notes and sketches

Handwritten notes and sketches

Handwritten notes and sketches penned by a former curator are kept in the museum’s hidden Invertebrate Zoology collection.

Scorpion Bombs

Scorpion Bombs

Can you imagine having a jar full of scorpions dropped on you? Scholars suspect that a small desert kingdom used ceramic bombs filled with venomous... Continue Reading

Sun Conures

Sun Conures

This brightly colored bird is one of two sun conures in Carnegie Museum of Natural History’s living collection. Known for their vivid colors, these small... Continue Reading

Dippy Dino Rocks

Dippy Dino Rocks

Dippy, our museum’s most famous dinosaur, has inspired young paleontologists for years, and his statue on Forbes Avenue inspires selfies outside of the museum every... Continue Reading

Turtle Bottoms

Turtle Bottoms

Spotted turtles   by Patrick McShea Upside down is an unnatural state. Yet within the museum’s display of Pennsylvania turtles, four... Continue Reading

keel-billed toucan

keel-billed toucan

The keel-billed toucan is the national bird of Belize. This taxidermy mount is on display in Bird Hall. (photo by Hayley Pontia)

The great green macaw

The great green macaw

The great green macaw, an inhabitant of tropical rainforests, is dependent upon certain species of old-growth trees for food and nest sites. Unfortunately, neotropical rainforests... Continue Reading

woodland kingfisher

woodland kingfisher

The woodland kingfisher perches and swoops like its aquatic relatives, but it mostly targets insects and other terrestrial prey instead of fish. This taxidermy mount... Continue Reading

Adult male rusty blackbird

Adult male rusty blackbird

This adult male rusty blackbird was banded March 29, 2017 at Powdermill Nature Reserve, Carnegie Museum of Natural History’s environmental research center.

Sinodelphys szalayi

Sinodelphys szalayi

Sinodelphys szalayi is the earliest known relative of modern marsupials like kangaroos, wallabies, and opossums. Sinodelphys shows that although most modern marsupials live in Australia... Continue Reading

three species of milkweed

three species of milkweed

Specimens from these three species of milkweed can be found in the museum’s historic herbarium. Milkweed produces poisonous compounds that some insects like monarch butterflies... Continue Reading

Graptemysgibbonsi

Graptemysgibbonsi

Graptemys gibbonsi, a holotype specimen in Carnegie Museum of Natural History’s fluid-preserved collection known as the Alcohol House (Photo by Paul S. Freed)

Ostriches

Ostriches

Ostriches, like this one on display in the Hall of African Wildlife, are the largest living birds.

Mollusks on display

Mollusks on display

A common violet sea snail, a limpet, and a royal murex in Carnegie Museum of Natural History’s Section of Mollusks.

Barbary Lions

Barbary Lions

Museum records identify the lions in our famous Lion Attacking a Dromedary diorama as members of the Barbary lion subspecies. Now extinct in the wild, these lions... Continue Reading

Happy Mother’s Day

Happy Mother’s Day

Collected in 1908 (the first year Mother’s Day was celebrated!), this specimen was grown in cultivation at the former western headquarters for the Ferry-Morse Seed... Continue Reading

Funerary boat

Funerary boat

This boat, which was discovered outside of Cairo in the Dashur pyramid complex, is currently on display in Walton Hall of Ancient Egypt. Egyptologists believe... Continue Reading

Gallery of Paleontology, 1907

Gallery of Paleontology, 1907

Gallery of Paleontology, 1907 vs. a recent picture of Dinosaurs in Their Time.  It is amazing how much one museum can change in a century!

Tail support

Tail support

A Carnegie Museum of Natural History employee welds tail support for Apatosaurus in 1915.

“Pyrite Sun”

“Pyrite Sun”

This “Pyrite Sun” may look like a sand dollar, but it is actually a concretion that was found in Illinois.

Did you know?

Did you know?

Did you know that Carnegie Museum of Natural History has about 13 million specimens in the Section of Invertebrate Zoology? Get a peek at the... Continue Reading

Lakota Moccasins

Lakota Moccasins

In the Lakota culture, women sometimes express affection for men and children by beading every surface of their moccasins. These beaded moccasins are on display... Continue Reading

Egg-cellent Egg Hunt

Egg-cellent Egg Hunt

Museum staff members were feeling festive as they stuffed thousands of plastic eggs for the Egg-cellent Egg Hunt on Saturday. The first 500 children to participate... Continue Reading

Tufted Titmouse

Tufted Titmouse

A Tufted Titmouse photographed this winter at Powermill Nature Reserve

Iguana

Iguana

This iguana is part of Carnegie Museum of Natural History’s living collection. We feature live animal shows every day at our museum.

Cone Snail Shells

Cone Snail Shells

Cone snail shells in the Section of Mollusks’ hidden collection

Butterflies

Butterflies

Discover more about beautiful butterflies at Amazing Butterflies through April 23.

A Messenger’s Risk

A Messenger’s Risk

by Patrick McShea “What would happen if the frozen action depicted in the Lion Attacking a Dromedary diorama continued?” Before posing that question to school... Continue Reading

Squirrels at CMNH

Squirrels at CMNH

by John Wible Like many people in western Pennsylvania, I share my yard with gray squirrels (Sciurus caroliensis). Other than the mammalian pets in our... Continue Reading

Specimens from South America

Specimens from South America

These specimens from South America are part of a huge collection inside of Carnegie Museum of Natural History’s Alcohol House.

Egyptian Potters

Egyptian Potters

Egyptian potters borrowed the Roman technique of applying small dots of clay, here in a different color, to a vessel’s body. We call vessels decorated... Continue Reading

Blue Whale

Blue Whale

This mandible of a blue whale is more than 17 feet long! It is on display in Carnegie Museum of Natural History.

Hunter and Walrus Statue

Hunter and Walrus Statue

Hunter and walrus statue made of steatite, ivory, and leather found in Wyckoff Hall of Arctic Life at Carnegie Museum of Natural History

Black Opal Ring

Black Opal Ring

Black Opal ring on display in Wertz Gallery: Gems and Jewelry at Carnegie Museum of Natural History

Scientists Live

Scientists Live

Carnegie Museum of Natural History botanist Bonnie Isaac was live from the hidden collections last month!

The Unseen Museum

The Unseen Museum

The Unseen Museum: “Magician’s Mask” This mask is part of a collection purchased in 1902 from Walther Karl, who lived in Matadi, Congo. There is... Continue Reading

Spotted Flower Beetle

Spotted Flower Beetle

This species of scarab, Stephanorrhina guttata, is commonly referred to as the spotted flower beetle. These specimens are on display at Carnegie Museum of Natural... Continue Reading

Narwhal statue

Narwhal statue

This ivory and steatite narwhal statue was created by Iguptark Tongelik and can be found in Polar World: Wyckoff Hall of Arctic Life.

Ask a Paleontologist

Ask a Paleontologist

In January, Carnegie Museum of Natural History paleontologist Dr. Matt Lamanna talked from the Big Bone Room of Carnegie Museum of Natural History on Facebook... Continue Reading

The Unseen Museum

The Unseen Museum

The Unseen Museum: Ka’apor Necklace This necklace (tukaniwar) was worn by women of the Ka’apor tribe of eastern Brazil for the Ta’i Rupi Taha name-giving... Continue Reading

Amazing Butterflies

Amazing Butterflies

Discover more about the lifecycle of butterflies at the fun, interactive exhibition—Amazing Butterflies. Open through April 23.

Carolina Wren

Carolina Wren

Researchers banded this Carolina Wren in February at Powdermill Nature Reserve.

Pyromorphite

Pyromorphite

This pyromorphite from Chester County in Pennsylvania is on display in Hillman Hall of Minerals and Gems.

Best Museum Exhibit

Best Museum Exhibit

Carnegie Museum of Natural History received an award for best museum exhibit at the Tucson Gem and Mineral Show. Congratulations to Curator of Collections Marc... Continue Reading

Hidden Collection

Hidden Collection

Specimens from Carnegie Museum of Natural History’s hidden collection

Did you know?

Did you know?

Did you know that Carnegie Museum of Natural History purchased the Lion Attacking a Dromedary diorama from the American Museum of Natural History in New... Continue Reading

Golden-Crowned Kinglet

Golden-Crowned Kinglet

This Golden-Crowned Kinglet was banded at Powdermill Nature Reserve, Carnegie Museum of Natural History’s environmental research center.

Fossilized Elatides

Fossilized Elatides

Conifers like this fossilized Elatides specimen were common during the Late Cretaceous period. This tree may have resembled the modern Norfolk Island Pine, which exists... Continue Reading

Gecko

Gecko

This friendly little gecko is museum director Eric Dorfman’s new office mate!    

W.E. Clyde Todd

W.E. Clyde Todd

W.E. Clyde Todd, curator of Ornithology 1914-1945 at Carnegie Museum of Natural History  

Clams

Clams

Is having a few hundred clams under your lake dock a good thing or a bad thing? A reader recently asked that question of Cottage... Continue Reading

Monarchs

Monarchs

Monarchs migrate farther than any other butterflies in the world– up to 3,000 miles and back. Milkweed, shown in this Botany Hall diorama, is an... Continue Reading

Hieroglyphs

Hieroglyphs

The hieroglyphs on this ancient Egyptian relief fragment were once inlaid with blue paste.(photo by Hayley Pontia)  

H Is for Hawk

H Is for Hawk

It’s not an untouched wilderness like a mountaintop, but a ramshackle wildness in which people and the land have conspired to strangeness.” ― Helen Macdonald,... Continue Reading

Profile of Dippy on BBC

Profile of Dippy on BBC

Pittsburgh isn’t the only city that loves Diplodocus carnegii. A cast of our museum’s most famous dinosaur in London also has an enthusiastic following! Listen to a... Continue Reading

Strange Times on WESA

Strange Times on WESA

Curious about the Strange Times performance series happening across all four Carnegie Museums this year? Read about the series and the concept of the Anthropocene... Continue Reading

Butternut

Butternut

(photo by Hayley Pontia) Butternut, a part of the walnut family, displayed in the Hall of Botany at Carnegie Museum of... Continue Reading

Soapstone and Ivory Walrus

Soapstone and Ivory Walrus

Soapstone and ivory carved walrus from Pangnirtung, Canada on display in Carnegie Museum of Natural History’s Polar World. (photo by Hayley Pontia)

Coloring Wall

Coloring Wall

Ashley Cecil, Carnegie Museum of Natural History’s artist in residence, created a pattern that museum visitors can color and decorate in the back of Discovery... Continue Reading

Green Russula

Green Russula

(Photo by Hayley Pontia) Green Russula found in the Hall of Botany

Andrew Carnegie

Andrew Carnegie

In 1898, Andrew Carnegie sent this newspaper clipping to Carnegie Museum of Natural History Director Dr. William J. Holland with a $10,000 check and a... Continue Reading

Snow goggles

Snow goggles

Snow goggles made of caribou bone and sinew found on Holman Island, in the northwest territory of Canada, on display at Carnegie Museum of Natural... Continue Reading

Ruth Trimble

Ruth Trimble

Pictured above holding a bird study skin is Ruth Trimble, a scientist who served as an assistant curator of Ornithology at Carnegie Museum of Natural... Continue Reading

Art in Bird Hall

Art in Bird Hall

If you walk through Bird Hall this month, you might notice that there are more than just specimens on display. Artist in Residence Ashley Cecil... Continue Reading

Paleo Field Tools

Paleo Field Tools

By Patrick McShea Although work gloves, rock hammers, chisels, and protective goggles remain standard field equipment for fossil field work, electronic devices have become critical... Continue Reading

Scientists have discovered

Scientists have discovered

Scientists have discovered more than 180,000 species of Lepidoptera (moths, butterflies, and skippers), of this amount only 20,000 are butterflies.

Become a butterfly

Become a butterfly

Become a butterfly at Carnegie Museum of Natural History this January with our newest exhibition — Amazing Butterflies! Shrink down to the size of a... Continue Reading

Snails

Snails

Tree snails from Florida (top row) and land snails from Cuba (bottom row) on display at Carnegie Museum of Natural History(Photo... Continue Reading

Smithsonite and gypsum

Smithsonite and gypsum

Smithsonite and gypsum in Hillman Hall of Minerals and Gems. (photo by Hayley Pontia)

Strange Times

Strange Times

JUST ANNOUNCED! Carnegie Nexus, a new interdisciplinary event series, kicks off this January with “Strange Times: Earth in the Age of the Human" Who better... Continue Reading

Happy Thanksgiving

Happy Thanksgiving

Happy Thanksgiving from Carnegie Museum of Natural History! This cute little turkey poult was photographed at our environmental research center Powdermill Nature Reserve.

Beetle Discovery

Beetle Discovery

In the Section of Invertebrate Zoology, our scientists are doing important pest monitoring work in collaboration with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) by... Continue Reading

Foxy sparrow

Foxy sparrow

A foxy sparrow banded at Powdermill Nature Reserve, Carnegie Museum of Natural History’s environmental research center.

Owl study skins

Owl study skins

Owl study skins from Carnegie Museum of Natural History’s hidden collection. Our Section of Birds cares for nearly 195,000 specimens of birds, including  555 holotypes... Continue Reading

Specimen Drawer

Specimen Drawer

A specimen drawer from our hidden collection Photo by Josh Franzos 

New Dioramas at CMNH

New Dioramas at CMNH

We made exciting progress on our redesigned gift shop this week here at Carnegie Museum of Natural History! Three beautifully restored dioramas were wrapped in... Continue Reading

Old and new specimen drawers

Old and new specimen drawers

Old and new specimen drawers in the Section of Vertebrate Paleontology behind the scenes at Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh.

Year of the Vampire

Year of the Vampire

Our most recent 21+ event, Haunted Museum: Year of the Vampire, featured a vampire-inspired fashion show in the Carnegie Music Hall lobby courtesy of Black... Continue Reading

As habitats change

As habitats change

As habitats change and species die out, collections at natural history museums become increasingly important for biodiversity research. These colorful Carolina parakeets were once the... Continue Reading

Dinosaur eggs!

Dinosaur eggs!

Dinosaur eggs! These fossilized eggs are part of Carnegie Museum of Natural History’s hidden collection in the Section of Vertebrate Paleontology.

Pink Calcite

Pink Calcite

This pink calcite was collected in Zaire. Calcite in its pure form is colorless. However, ionic substitutes or mechanical inclusions of other materials cause calcite... Continue Reading

Deforestation Damages

Deforestation Damages

by Patrick McShea Museum exhibits frequently provide information to help us better understand current headlines. In the case of the devastation Hurricane Matthew recently caused... Continue Reading

Yellow-breasted Chat

Yellow-breasted Chat

A yellow-breasted Chat banded at Powdermill Nature Reserve, Carnegie Museum of Natural History’s environmental research center

Specimen drawer

Specimen drawer

Specimen drawer from our hidden collection at Carnegie Museum of Natural History

Craniums and mandibles

Craniums and mandibles

Craniums and mandibles of various mammals on display in the Hall of North American Wildlife.

X-rays at Discovery Basecamp

X-rays at Discovery Basecamp

Visitors can examine all different types of x-rays at Discovery Basecamp, our new permanent, interactive gallery that invites visitors to take part in hands-on learning.

Swainson’s Thrush

Swainson’s Thrush

A Swainson’s Thrush banded at Powdermill Nature Reserve, Carnegie Museum of Natural History’s environmental research center.

Aquamarine on display

Aquamarine on display

Aquamarine on display at Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh.(Photo by Hayley Pontia)    

Wulfenite

Wulfenite

Wulfenite found in Mexico (photo by Hayley Pontia)  

Artist in residence

Artist in residence

Carnegie Museum of Natural History’s artist in residence Ashley Cecil brought these study skins from our collection back to life with her drawings that she’ll... Continue Reading

Decorated Horn

Decorated Horn

Decorated Horn (ca. 1627/1606-1539 B.C.) found in Walton Hall of Ancient Egypt (Photo by Hayley Pontia)

Scallop and Pecten found in Pilocene

Scallop and Pecten found in Pilocene

Scallop and Pecten found in Pilocene, California on display in Benedum Hall of Geology at Carnegie Museum of Natural History. (Photo by Hayley Pontia)

Mollusk Collection

Mollusk Collection

by Hayley Pontia Carnegie Museum of Natural History’s collection of mollusks is home to about 3 million specimens that include more land and freshwater snails... Continue Reading

Selected for Speed

Selected for Speed

by Patrick McShea At first it seems absurd to discuss speed in front of adiorama in which nothing moves. With appropriate prompts, however, this threedimensional... Continue Reading

Unaltered remains of Peccary

Unaltered remains of Peccary

Unaltered remains of Peccary, a mid-sized hoofed pig-like mammal, found in Kentucky. (Photo by Hayley Pontia)

Pholidophorus macrocephalus

Pholidophorus macrocephalus

Pholidophorus macrocephalus is a bony fish that lived about 150 million years ago in the late Jurassic Period of the Mesozoic Era.

Young Green Heron

Young Green Heron

A young green heron banded at Powdermill Nature Reserve, the environmental research center of Carnegie Museum of Natural History.

Peridot, the beautiful yellow-green gem

Peridot, the beautiful yellow-green gem

Until recently, peridot, the beautiful yellow-green gem featured in pendant above, was the only birth stone for the month of August. Now spinel accompanies it.

Diplodocus Carnegii

Diplodocus Carnegii

The one and only… diplodocus carnegii! Well not only. Casts of diplodocus carnegii (nicknamed Dippy) we made in the early 1900s and sent to museums in cities... Continue Reading

An Appalachian Research Hub

An Appalachian Research Hub

Researchers at Powdermill Nature Reserve, the environmental research center of Carnegie Museum of Natural History, are documenting the health of Western Pennsylvania’s flora and fauna... Continue Reading

Fedexia striegeli

Fedexia striegeli

Fedexia striegeli was a member of an extinct amphibian group called trematopids, which lived in the tropical Pittsburgh climate almost 305 million years ago. Fedexia... Continue Reading

Dioptase on Calcite

Dioptase on Calcite

Dioptase on Calcite found in Namibia on display at Carnegie Museum of Natural History. (photo by Hayley Pontia) 

Fossilized shells on display

Fossilized shells on display

Fossilized shells on display in Benedum Hall of Geology at Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh. (photo by Hayley Pontia) 

Dig Site in Sheep Creek

Dig Site in Sheep Creek

This picture shows a man at work at a dig site in Sheep Creek, the site in Wyoming where Diplodocus Carnegii was discovered.

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail

An Eastern tiger swallowtail and various species of plant life found in Pennsylvania’s Laurel Highlands on display in Art of Diorama. (Photo by Hayley Pontia)

Quartz Crystal

Quartz Crystal

This quartz crystal was found in Russia and has its bright color due to small concentrations of chemical impurities or inclusions of other minerals. (Photo... Continue Reading

Vernonia altissima

Vernonia altissima

Vernonia altissima’s bright flowers provide an important food source for native pollinators found in Pennsylvania and many other surrounding states. (Photo by Hayley Pontia)  

Rhodochrosite and quartz

Rhodochrosite and quartz

Rhodochrosite and quartz on display in Hillman Hall of Minerals and Gems (photo by Hayley Pontia)  

Dinosaurs in Their Time

Dinosaurs in Their Time

Dinosaurs in Their Time and the rest of Carnegie Museum of Natural History will be open July 4th! (Photo by Josh Franzos)

Hopi Katsina doll

Hopi Katsina doll

This Hopi Katsina doll was collected in 1900 and is called Whipper. Katsina dolls are representations of benevolent spirits.

Lakota moccasins

Lakota moccasins

These Lakota moccasins are more than 100 years old. It’s thought that the horseshoes beaded onto the moccasins reflect the wearer’s prowess in acquiring horses.

Art of the Diorama

Art of the Diorama

Red-footed booby specimens on display in Art of the Diorama, an exhibition at Carnegie Museum of Natural History that explores the evolution of natural dioramas.... Continue Reading

Lariosaurus

Lariosaurus

This Lariosaurus was a Middle Triassic nothosaur that could grow up to 10 feet long!

Cicadas at Powdermill

Cicadas at Powdermill

The cicadas are here! Staff at Powdermill Nature Reserve, Carnegie Museum of Natural History’s environmental research center, posted these up-close photos of this 17-year cicada... Continue Reading

Boulder Selfies!

Boulder Selfies!

Take a selfie with our life-sized replica of the Indiana Jones boulder NEXT WEEKEND at Indiana Jones…After Dark on June 10. Tickets on sale now!... Continue Reading

Discovery Basecamp

Discovery Basecamp

Pots from our archaeology collection on display in Discovery Basecamp, Carnegie Museum of Natural History’s new permanent interactive gallery.  

Invertebrate Zoology

Invertebrate Zoology

Stunning shades of yellows and oranges in the invertebrate zoology collections on display at Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh. (Photo by Hayley Pontia)

C is for Carnegie

C is for Carnegie

The Carnegie “C” on the front doors of the Carnegie Museum of Natural History.

Dippy in Red

Dippy in Red

Dippy put his scarves back in the closest for now as he soaks in this spring weather! He’s sporting a red bandanna for a new... Continue Reading

Dinohyus hollandi

Dinohyus hollandi

Dinohyus hollandi translated from Latin means “terrible pig.” The fossils of this frightening, 6-foot-tall omnivore were found in Nebraska and are on display at Carnegie... Continue Reading

Front Line Birds

Front Line Birds

Carnegie Museum of Natural History’s taxidermied Goshawk By Patrick McShea Best-selling books aren’t usually discussed during our daily 15-minute customer service personnel... Continue Reading

Jane

Jane

Carnegie Museum of Natural History’s juvenile Tyrannosaurus rex “Jane” (Photo by Hayley Pontia)

Race for the Cure

Race for the Cure

Dippy, our 22-foot tall dinosaur sculpture, is sporting pink this week for Sunday’s Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure in Pittsburgh!

Do you think

Do you think

Do you think this lion’s jaws ever gets tired of keeping the Grand Staircase lit at Carnegie Museum of Natural History?

Superb Lyrebird

Superb Lyrebird

If you thought you were having a great hair day, check out the  in Carnegie Museum of Natural History’s Bird Hall. Males Superb Lyrebird attract... Continue Reading

Scarlet Cup fungus

Scarlet Cup fungus

Scarlet Cup fungus in Carnegie Museum of Natural History’s Hall of Botany.

Pyrite Concretion

Pyrite Concretion

(Photo by Debra Wilson) Multi-colored pyrite concretion from Russia  

Pterosaurs installed

Pterosaurs installed

Three new pterosaur casts were installed in late March and are now flying high over our museum’s prehistoric landscape. A flock of Cycnorhamphus pterosaurs were carefully... Continue Reading

Shabtis

Shabtis

Shabtis, small statues found in ancient Egyptian tombs, are on display in the Walton Hall of Ancient Egypt.

Bee-balm

Bee-balm

Bee-balm (Monarda didyma Linnaeus) specimen in the Botany collection. Image credit: Josh Franzos/Carnegie Museum of Natural History.

Color Returns

Color Returns

By Patrick McShea Within the Hall of Botany, a male wood duck’s beautiful plumage shares splendor with the fall foliage of a quaking bog in... Continue Reading

AP3: Expedition 2016

AP3: Expedition 2016

“It’s not just dino bones we’re seeking. Here’s some fossilized wood found on Cape Lamb.” Matt Lamanna is a paleontologist and the principal dinosaur researcher... Continue Reading

Signature Specimen

Signature Specimen

This signature specimen is a hemimorphite after calcite with greenockite inclusions from near Joplin, Missouri. It was donated to the museum in 1897 and was... Continue Reading

AP3 Expedition 2016

AP3 Expedition 2016

AP3 Expedition 2016: Sunset at Vega Camp (photo: Pat O'Connor) Matt Lamanna, is a paleontologist and the principal dinosaur researcher at Carnegie Museum of Natural... Continue Reading

AP3 Expedition

AP3 Expedition

AP3 Expedition: Antarctica peninsula paleontology project 2016.

Blue Fleece Jacket

Blue Fleece Jacket

by Patrick McShea Call it simple digital entertainment. While checking the Tumblr blog of Carnegie Museum of Natural History for pictures and progress reports from... Continue Reading

Winterwerk

Winterwerk

An example of Swiss “Winterwerk” c 1780 Tucson Gem and Mineral Show (Photo by Eric Dorfman)

Making their way to Antarctica

Making their way to Antarctica

Matt Lamanna and Steve Salisbury and the AP3 crew making their way to Antarctica. Read their hourly updates on Twitter (@antarcticdinos).

Eastern Pondhawk

Eastern Pondhawk

Eastern Pondhawk (female) (Erythemis simplicicollis) at Powdermill Nature Reserve.

Eastern tiger swallowtail

Eastern tiger swallowtail

Eastern tiger swallowtail (Papilio glaucus) at Powdermill Nature Reserve. Image © Joe Stavish/Carnegie Museum of Natural History.

Humpback whale

Humpback whale

Paleontologist Matt Lamanna caught this image of a Humpback whale on his expedition in Greenland in 2014. Whale Males produce a complex song lasting up... Continue Reading

Crane fly

Crane fly

Adult head of crane fly (Erioptera) enlarged by a scanning electron microscope. © Carnegie Museum of Natural History. (at Carnegie Museum... Continue Reading

Punctum minutissimum

Punctum minutissimum

How can research shape our understanding of the local natural world? In 1985 the smallest land snail in Pennsylvania, Punctum minutissimum, was reported to be... Continue Reading

Smoky Quartz

Smoky Quartz

Smoky Quartz, Amazonite from Colorado. Image © Carnegie Museum of Natural History. (at Carnegie Museum of Natural History)

Portion of a Stela

Portion of a Stela

Portion of a stela (painted limestone). The inscription says that this offering stela was made by Wennefer, son of Paiwenhor, and dedicated to Osiris. (ca.... Continue Reading

Bear’s Head Tooth Mushroom

Bear’s Head Tooth Mushroom

Bear’s Head Tooth Mushroom (Hericium americanum) at Powdermill Nature Reserve. Image © Joe Stavish / Carnegie Museum of Natural History.  

Black Swallowtail caterpillar

Black Swallowtail caterpillar

Black Swallowtail caterpillar (Papilio polyxenes) at Powdermill Nature Reserve. Image © Joe Stavish / Carnegie Museum of Natural History.  

Microraptor fossil

Microraptor fossil

This microraptor fossil was illegally brought into the U.S. and will be returned to China thanks to the efforts by Carnegie Museum of Natural History... Continue Reading

Tyrannosaurus rex

Tyrannosaurus rex

In 1905 the name “Tyrannosaurus rex” was given to this highly-recognized dinosaur.

Blue Jays

Blue Jays

Did you know that the pigment of Blue Jays is actually brown but they appear blue because the barbules which feathers are composed of scatter... Continue Reading

Longhorn beetle

Longhorn beetle

Longhorn beetle, a member of family Cerambycidae, at Powdermill Nature Reserve. Image credit: © Joe Stavish/Carnegie Museum of Natural History. (at Powdermill Nature Reserve)

Spinel from Vietnam

Spinel from Vietnam

#MineralMonday: Spinel from Vietnam. Highly fluorescent crystals under Long Wave Ultraviolet light to 1.2 cm. Image © Carnegie Museum of Natural History. (at Carnegie Museum... Continue Reading

Juvenile Rainbow Boa

Juvenile Rainbow Boa

The iridescent sheen in the skin of this juvenile rainbow boa (Epichrates cenchria) inspired its name. Unlike many other boas, rainbow boas are mostly terrestrial... Continue Reading

Recently Discovered Pterosaur

Recently Discovered Pterosaur

carnegiemuseumnaturalhistory: This recently discovered pterosaur, found in Liaoning Province, China, has a long, straight tail, like most primitive species on the pterosaur evolutionary tree. But... Continue Reading

Scaphognathus

Scaphognathus

Scaphognathus was a pterosaur that lived in what is now Germany during the Late Jurassic about 150 million years ago. This fossil preserves an incomplete... Continue Reading